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Import waveforms from a wave file

I'd like to import waveforms from a wave file. For the beginning it would be sufficient to import from a single cycle wave file.

Of course these waveforms could not be edited via breakpoints then.

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    Jakob RangAdminJakob Rang (Founder, Cableguys) shared this idea  ·   ·  Admin →

    10 comments

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      • nannygrimshawnannygrimshaw commented  · 

        Frank; i have no idea what you're describing there, but i don't think it's what i was talking about : 0
        if you download Karlheinz Essl's wonderful 'RePlay' software, you'll see what i mean; a window (which is looped continually) which can walk or jump around in a sample.. if the sample is a long and complex one, you get all kinds of varying/evolving timbres; if a simpler one, you get more gently changing ones. the fun thing is, as with all waveform synthesis, the pitch is governed by the length of the window, rather than the pitch of the sample.
        Jakob; if we had a 'layer' type window (or a translucent one), so that you could 'trace' a waveform, then we could have breakpoints, as we would be drawing our own wave; we just need to be able to see the original sample underneath. clever, no?

      • Frank WagnerFrank Wagner commented  · 

        @ Jakob: I don't think you will have to care about the legal context. Simple compare your distribution to that one of a CD recorder or the LAME codec - although it makes a customer able do do piracy, nobody can punish the devellopers of them for just bringing the possibility to do so. If it's visible from which user a cycle template was contributed, he could be punished.
        @ nannygrimshaw: For the momentary situation i recommend to use a professional Audio Editor like Adobe Audition (I use v1.5 as it holds many functions that got blown in newer versions). For example: Let's say you're working on 44.1 kHz and want to sample a cycle of 55 Hz (exact A), you might pitch it up to 55.125 Hz to get a cycle time thats integer to the sampling rate. If Curve improves for loading wave files you're already done by just sampling one cycle that contains the highest harmonics found in the original tone - subtractive synthesis. To be honest: I even like the actual method of just editing in one fixed window.

      • Jakob RangAdminJakob Rang (Founder, Cableguys) commented  · 

        We are not sure about the legal context of importing (and then uploading) wav files, which might be copyrighted. We would need to find out before implementing this.

      • Jakob RangAdminJakob Rang (Founder, Cableguys) commented  · 

        @nannygrimshaw: Thanks for your idea!

        This is possible, but would make the task bigger. But that's ok, things can be improved in iterations. So I guess it is best if we first do the basic task of only importing single cycle wave files, and then voting goes for improvements on that.

      • nannygrimshawnannygrimshaw commented  · 

        thanks francesco! very useful! thanks too to adventurekid!

        as i understand it, curve currently uses a static 'window'; cycling through the entire waveform selected (wave 1, 2 etc) as the source..
        what i would like, though, is for the window to move through the wave, as if it were a smaller window, 'walking' or 'jumping' at random about in the waveform. this would be useful for reading from larger wav files, creating an endlessly varying sound.
        possible?

      • Jakob RangAdminJakob Rang (Founder, Cableguys) commented  · 

        This feature has a time estimate of: 21

        The order in which we implement features is determined by the "bang". This is your votes divided by a time estimate (specification + implementation time).

        A simple feature will have a time estimate of "1". A more complex feature that takes 20 times as long to implement has an estimate of "20", and needs 20 times as many points as the simple one before we address it.

        Of course the bang is not the only thing that influences us, we also see our role in making the final decision. But we need strong arguments if we postpone a feature with a high bang.

      • nannygrimshawnannygrimshaw commented  · 

        this was the only other feature request i was going to make! (besides incoming audio; see forum)
        although i don't see why breakpoints could not be added to an imported wav file... but then i'm not a software developer!

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